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soundrycreations:

Polyphonic Overtone Singing Demonstrated by Anna-Maria Hefele

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55: Restaurant Sound Design

In the 2013 Zagat Dining Trends Survey, diners shared information about their tipping habits, favorite cuisines, and even their top complaints about restaurants. Not surprisingly, high prices, poor service, and crowded restaurants were some of the biggest gripes, but the number one complaint was noise. How much of the sound is there by design and how can restaurant owners use sound to make dining out a more pleasant (and less noisy) experience?

Clark Wolf has consulted to restaurants, hotels, and just about every type of venue where people gather to enjoy food. Part of his job is to think about the ways in which sound can be used to enhance dining experiences. Learn more about the best and the worst of sound and music in restaurants with Clark Wolf on this episode of Everything Sounds.

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54: Shapenote

Shapenote singing is a tradition developed in the late 1700’s and early 1800’s that helped everyday people sing music even if they couldn’t sight-read standard musical notation. Shapenote and the Sacred Harp songbook are still allowing people to share a musical experience until this day. Learn more about this tradition from Anne Heider, Robert from the Chicago Shapenote Singers, and Ruth Reveal.

You can learn more about Shapenote, the Sacred Harp, and find singings in your area at fasola.org.

Thanks to Kate Lumpkin for her help with this episodes.

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laughingsquid:

Openmix, A Tiny Portable Audio Mixer That Lets Users Mix Smartphones Like Turntables
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popchartlab:

We’ve been celebrating rappers all week, but where would they be if we had nothing to listen to their music on? Check out our ode to audio advancement, which tracks the music player’s progression from 1840 to the modern day—click here for the full diagram of 219 devices! 

popchartlab:

We’ve been celebrating rappers all week, but where would they be if we had nothing to listen to their music on? Check out our ode to audio advancement, which tracks the music player’s progression from 1840 to the modern day—click here for the full diagram of 219 devices! 

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53: The Black Country

Individuals can share a common language, but it can sound different due to accents and regional dialects. In some cases, there are profound differences between areas that are in close proximity to one another. The Black Country, an area of the West Midlands in England, is known for a unique dialect that can be difficult for modern English speakers to clearly understand. In this episode, Alex Adey shares stories of the history and torchbearers of the Black Country dialect.

You can find more resources and educational material about the Black Country at the Black Country Museum.